Heritage Rose Society

Heritage Rose Society

A Committee of the Charleston Horticultural Society

Charleston’s horticultural history began with 16th-century explorers. By the time the English arrived in the 17th-century, reports of the Lowcountry’s rich flora had already been circulating throughout Europe.  The naturalists Mark Catesby and John Bartram visited in the 18th century and increased botanical knowledge in the area. Dr. Alexander Garden, who practiced medicine in Charleston, made important contributions to plant identification. He is most remembered for the gardenia named in his honor by Linnaeus, the famous Swedish botanist who established the modern system of plant classification.

Sometime around 1802, John Champneys, a Charleston planter, crossed Rosa Chinensis (Old Blush) and Rosa Moschata, a white musk rose to create Champneys’Pink Cluster. This created America’s first hybridized rose. It was given to his friend and neighbor, Philippe Noisette, a French botanist, and a more refined rose was hybridized, eventually named Blush Noisette. Philippe sent the rose to his brother, Louis Claude, a nurseryman and member of the Noisette family who were gardeners to French nobility. Pierre Joseph Redoute, the famous botanical artist, included in his paintings of early 19th enturay roses one labeled “Rosa Noisettiana” and “Rosier de Philippe Noisette.” The name, Noisette, spread throughout the world by way of the painting. Today, the Noisettes with their delicate blossoms, pastel colors and mesmerizing scents mix well with the Lowcountry’s legendary flowering shrubs to create the memorable gardens of Charleston.

The Noisette Roses are vigorous plants with a profusion of blooms. They are also tough enough to take the heat of the southern summer and the vagaries of the southern winter. Also, the Noisettes have remarkable resistance to disease as well as a high recovery rate. The Heritage Rose Trail was created for the Ninth International Heritage Rose Conference which was held in Charleston in 2001. The roses are a gift in perpetuity to the citizens of Charleston.  Purchase now.

HERITAGE ROSE TRAIL MAP

Welcome to the Heritage Rose Trail!

This trail was created for the 9th International Heritage Rose Conference held in Charleston, South Carolina October 14-18, 2001. The roses are a gift to the citizens of Charleston to enjoy in perpetuity.

Charleston’s horticultural history began with the 16th century explorers. When the English arrived in the 17th century, reports of the Lowcountry’s rich flora were already circulating throughout Europe. Visits in the 18th century by naturalists, Mark Catesby and John Bartram, increased botanical knowledge. Dr. Alexander Garden who practiced medicine in Charleston madeadditional contributions to plant identification. He is remembered also for the gardenia named in his honor by Linnaeus, the famous Swedish botanist who established the modern system of plant classification. The outstanding contribution is yet to come! Sometime around 1802 John Champneys, a Charleston factor, crossed Rosa chinensis (Old Blush) and Rosa moschata, a white musk rose creating Champneys’ Pink Cluster, America’s first hybridized rose. It was given to his friend and neighbor, Philippe Noisette, a French botanist, and a more refined rose was hybridized, eventually named Blush Noisette. Philippe sent the rose to his brother, Louis Claude, a nurseryman and member of the Noisette family who were gardeners to French nobility. Pierre Joseph Redoute, the famous botanical artist included in his paintings of early 19th century roses one labeled “Rosa Noisettiana” and “Rosier de Philippe Noisette.” The name, Noisette, spread throughout the world by way of the painting. Today, the Noisettes with their delicate blossoms, pastel colors and mesmerizing scents mix well with the Lowcountry’s legendary flowering shrubs. Together, they create the memorable gardens of Charleston.  Philippe Noisette came to Charleston from France by way of Saint-Dominque to work in America’s first botanical garden developed by the Medical College of South Carolina. His descendants continued in the nursery tradition of the Noisette family, and roses were grown by them in Charleston until the middle of the 20th century.

A Special Note to Gardeners: The Noisette roses are vigorous plants with a profusion of bloom. They are also tough enough to take the heat of the Southern summer and the vagaries of the Southern winter. The Noisettes also have remarkable resistance to disease and a high recovery rate if it occurs. Founded in 2000, The Charleston Horticultural Society is a non-profit organization which seeks to inspiring excellence in Lowcountry horticulture. With membership open to all, the organization has grown to more than 1,250 individual and business members interested in learning about all aspects of horticulture through monthly lectures, a newsletter, educational workshops, and special garden tours. Charleston Trees, dedicated to ensuring the city’s green spaces are nurtured and expanded, and the Heritage Rose Committee, dedicated to educating the public on the historic contribution of Charleston as the source of the Noisette rose – the first class of rose to be developed in America, are both committees of the Charleston Horticultural Society. For additional information or to support the Society, please stop by 46 Windermere Boulevard, Charleston, SC 29407, or call 843-579-9922.

To follow the Heritage Rose Trail Map, click here to print the brochure.

The Charleston Horticultural Society

Contact us at (843) 579-9922 or info@chashortsoc.org

The Charleston Horticultural Society (CHS), founded in 2000, is a non-profit organization with membership open to all. The Society offers a wide array of horticultural information and involvement to its more than 1,300 individual and business members through lectures, educational workshops, garden tours, special events, and publications.