Thank you for supporting the CHS Hort with your plant purchase!   Below is information for all the plants we have offered for sale so far.

 

FERNS:

Arborvitae Fern (Selaginella braunii)

Selaginella braunii isn’t a fern or an arborvitae, but instead is a member of an obscure plant gang known as the spikemosses. Named after 19th century German botanist/pteridologist Alexander Braun, the dark green, lacy, semi-evergreen fronds of Braun’s arborvitae fern rise to 18″ tall from a slowly creeping rhizome. In 3 years you could expect a 2′ wide groundcover mass. The easy-to-grow, deer-resistant Selaginella braunii is a textural garden highlight alongside bolder foliage like hosta, Solomon’s seal, and ajuga.  Zone 6a-9b , part sun to shade. Needs water until established.  Height 18 in height.  Evergreen

 

 

Autumn Fern

Autumn fern is a colorful groundcover with pink fiddleheads that turn coppery orange as they unfurl. Fronds age to a lustrous dark green and remain well into winter. New growth continues through the season, giving a colorful tapestry effect of copper and green from spring to late fall.

 

 

 

 

 

Carrot Fern (Onychium jap.)

Carrot fern, Onychium japonicum, is an attractive, clump-forming fern with wiry black stems bearing arching dark green, feathery fronds that resemble carrot foliage. It’s perfect for using as tall ground cover in semi shade, and looks great alongside other ferns. It provides the perfect foil for flowering plants, both in the border and the vase. 

 

 

Cinnamon Fern (Osmundastrum cinnamomeum)

Bold, large, graceful fern to 3′ tall and wide with soft, green arching fronds in spring. In the early spring upright, cinnamon colored fruiting fronds emerge in the middle of each clump. Good in wet areas; naturalizes along stream beds. Forms thick, spreading colonies over time. Plant in light to medium shade. Native to the midwest and southeast. USDA zones 3-9.

 

 

 

 

 

Foxtail Fern

The Foxtail fern is an evergreen, drought-resistant plant that needs little care and looks bright green all year long. It is an easy plant to care for and will offer many years of enjoyment in your yard. Beautiful, feathery Foliage. Enjoys organic, well-drained soil. Great plant for hanging baskets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ghost Fern (Athyrium x ‘Ghost’)

Slowly spreading deciduous fern with bright white/gray new growth to around 18″ tall. Very striking in appearance, especially in spring. Plant in medium shade. Relatively new variety with highly contrasting foliage and texture for the garden. USDA zone 4 in cold hardiness

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hardy Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum x ‘Mairisii’)

Hardier selection of the southern maidenhair fern surviving to zone 6 in cold hardiness. Mairisii has the great foliage of the typical southern maidenhair fern growing to around 18″ tall by 24″ wide. Plant in light to medium shade. Give good drainage and consistent moisture. Few pests. Easy to grow. USDA zones 6-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holly Fern (Cyrtomium falcatum ‘Rochfordianum‘)

Improved holly fern variety to 3′ tall and wide with deep green, glossy leaves and a tidy, clean habit. Drought tolerant once established. Widely used in the Southeast US. Plant in light to full shade. USDA zone 6 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

Japanese Painted Fern (Athyrium nipponicum ‘Pictum’)

Slowly spreading deciduous fern with beautiful purple and gray new growth to 2′ in height. Makes a nice accent in any shade garden. Plant in medium shade. USDA zone 4 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Ostrich Fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris)

Bold yet graceful deciduous fern to at least 4′ wide and 4′ tall. This fern will spread over time into a colony of ferns which can reach 10 feet across. Newly emerging “fiddle head” fronds can be eaten if cooked. Large plume like fronds appear in spring to 4′ or more in height. Shorter fertile fronds appear in fall and persist into winter. Best to cut back all growth in late fall. Plant in medium to light shade. USDA zone 3 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

Shaggy Shield Fern (Dryopteris atrata)

Evergreen clumping fern to around 2′ tall and wide with deep green “shaggy” fronds with near black stems and spores. Very clean and and handsome in appearance. Plant in medium to light shade. USDA zone 5 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Southern Shield (Thelypteris kunthii)

Deciduous spreading fern native to the Southeast US with large, soft, green, arching fronds to 30″ tall eventually forming a thick, spreading mass. Very attractive over time. Easy to grow. Plant in medium to light shade with consistent moisture. Will go partially dormant under drought stress. USDA zones 7-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Upside Down Fern (Arachnoides standishii)

Known as upside down fern, this evergreen (deciduous after 20 degrees F) clumping fern has finely cut bright green fronds to 2′ tall and slightly wider. Exceptionally beautiful fern with striking foliage. Plant in light to medium shade. Highly sought after. USDA zone 4 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

BAPTISIA:  

 

Baptisia australis

Deciduous flowering shrub with bright lavender/blue pea flowers in extremely showy clusters nearly covering the plant in mid-spring. Attractive to butterflies. As an added bonus Baptisias fix nitrogen in the soil adding valuable natural fertilizer to plants around it. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. A native of the Carolinas. Cut back to ground after hard frost in the late fall. USDA zone 3 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Baptisia x ‘Carolina Moonlight’

Deciduous patented flowering shrub with bright clear yellow pea flowers in extremely showy clusters nearly covering the plant in mid-spring. Attractive to butterflies. As an added bonus Baptisias fix nitrogen in the soil adding valuable natural fertilizer to plants around it. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. A native of the Carolinas. Cut back to ground after hard frost in the late fall. USDA zone 3 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Baptisia x ‘Lunar Eclipse’

Baptisia ‘Lunar Eclipse’ stood out as one of the most unique baptisias we’ve grown, and in our opinion, the star of Jim Ault’s baptisia breeding at the Chicago Botanic Garden. The four way combination of genes from Baptisia australis, alba, leucophaea, and sphaerocarpa produced a superstar. Baptisia ‘Lunar Eclipse’ forms a sturdy 3′ tall x 3′ wide clump, topped, starting for us, in early to mid-May with spikes held above the foliage, and lined with large creamy-white flowers, that age to blue-lavender. The bicolor transition is absolutely magical…a breeding breakthrough in the genus baptisia. Baptisia ‘Lunar Eclipse’ grows equally fine in xeriscapes or as a pond-edge marginal.  Zone 4a -9b, Sun.

 

 

 

 

Baptisia x ‘Purple Smoke’

Deciduous flowering shrub with bright lavender/purple pea flowers in extremely showy clusters on a 3′ clump nearly covering the plant in mid-spring. Attractive to butterflies. As an added bonus Baptisias fix nitrogen in the soil adding valuable natural fertilizer to plants around it. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. A native of the Carolinas. Cut back to ground after hard frost in the late fall. USDA zone 4 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Baptisia x ‘Royal Purple’

Deciduous flowering shrub with deep purple pea flowers in extremely showy clusters on a 3′ clump nearly covering the plant in mid-spring. Attractive to butterflies. As an added bonus Baptisias fix nitrogen in the soil adding valuable natural fertilizer to plants around it. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. A native of the Carolinas. Cut back to ground after hard frost in the late fall. USDA zone 4 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

BRINDABELLA ROSES:

Brindabella Roses™, a collection of tough shrub roses selected for superior garden performance and show stopping flowers: bushy growth habits, excellent disease resistance, and fragrant doubled flowers in an array of traditional and modern colors. These low maintenance roses are very vigorous yet grow to only 4 feet tall and wide in 2 years’ time. Very well suited to home gardens and commercial landscapes alike, the foliage is among the cleanest to be found in any shrub rose and the fragrance will stop any passerby in their tracks.   Features densely foliaged, bushy growth habit; excellent resistance to black spot and powdery mildew; and large, double, fragrant flowers.

 

Brindabella Rose ‘Dawn’:  3 gallon; $30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brindabella Rose ‘Glow’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brindabella Rose ‘Purple’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brindabella Rose ‘Red’

Large, well-formed crimson red flowers with a traditional rose perfume.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brindabella Rose ‘Touch of Pink’

Add a little romance to your garden with these roses in the softest pink to nearly white. You’ll fall in love with the fragrance, too… it’s the classic rose scent we’ve all been missing in modern roses. But you will appreciate this new breeding advancement: The mildew- and black spot-resistant foliage is as clean as it comes with roses, and Brindabella Roses™ rebloom every 6 – 8 weeks without deadheading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

COLOCASIA

Colocasia ‘Black Coral’

Totally new introduction from the University of Hawaii setting a new standard for black elephant ears. Dark black, glossy leaves with blue veins on 4′ perennial clump. The leaves eventually reach 20″ wide by 30″ long. The best large dark black to date. Plant in part sun to medium shade. Give good drainage and consistent water. Feed with all purpose fertilizer. USDA zone 7 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Colocasia ‘Blue Hawaii’

Another new hybrid from the University of Hawaii with striking green leaves and dark bluish purple stems and veins. Eventually grows to around 5′ tall. Plant in wet spots in rich soil. Will tolerate sun or shade. Easy to grow. Mulch around base in cold winter areas. USDA zone 7 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Colocasia ‘Hawaiian Punch’

Primarily grown for its spectacular foliage, Colocasia esculenta ‘Hawaiian Punch‘ (Taro) is a tuberous, frost-tender perennial with long-stalked, thick and glossy, heart-shaped, fresh green leaves. Held on glossy red stems, the large leaves are adorned with attractive red margins and red veins on their underside.

 

 

 

 

Colocasia ‘Maui Gold’

Colocasia ‘Maui Gold‘ is the first clumping gold leaf colocasia to hit the market, forming a tight clump of stems that arch to 4’,… This colocasia boasts LIME GREEN / CHARTRUESE colored  foliage with ivory colored stems. Zone 7b-10   Part sun to shade. Likes moist soil.

 

 

 

 

 

HIBISCUS MOSCHEUTUS:

‘Midnight Marvel’

Deciduous hardy hibiscus that grows to around 4′ tall and wide producing 6-10″ deep, carmine red flowers summer through mid fall. As an added bonus this cultivar has dark, bronzy foliage. Cut back to around 4″ tall in November. Prefers full sun and wet situations, but will tolerate normal gardens if not allowed to dry out. Easy to grow. Very showy in bloom. Deer resistant. USDA zones 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

‘Mocha Moon’

Deciduous hardy hibiscus that grows to around 4′ tall and wide producing 6-10″ white flowers with cherry red centers summer through mid fall. As an added bonus this cultivar has dark, bronzy foliage. Cut back to around 4″ tall in November. Prefers full sun and wet situations, but will tolerate normal gardens if not allowed to dry out. Easy to grow. Very showy in bloom. Deer resistant. USDA zones 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

‘Summer in Paradise’

Deciduous hardy hibiscus that grows to around 4′ tall and wide producing 6-10″ hot pink flowers with cherry red centers summer through mid fall. As an added bonus this cultivar has dark, olive green foliage with purple markings. Cut back to around 4″ tall in November. Prefers full sun and wet situations, but will tolerate normal gardens if not allowed to dry out. Easy to grow. Very showy in bloom. Deer resistant. USDA zones 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

‘Kopper King’

Deciduous hardy hibiscus that grows to around 4′ tall and wide producing 6-10″ light pink flowers with cherry red centers summer through mid fall. As an added bonus this cultivar has dark, bronzy foliage. Cut back to around 4″ tall in November. Prefers full sun and wet situations, but will tolerate normal gardens if not allowed to dry out. Easy to grow. Very showy in bloom. Deer resistant. USDA zones 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

‘Lord Baltimore’

Deciduous hardy hibiscus that grows to around 4′ tall and wide producing 6-10″ bright, cherry red hibiscus flowers summer through mid fall. Cut back to around 4″ tall in November. Prefers full sun and wet situations, but will tolerate normal gardens if not allowed to dry out. Easy to grow. Very showy in bloom. Deer resistant. USDA zones 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

‘Lady Baltimore’

Deciduous hardy hibiscus that grows to around 4′ tall and a bit wider producing 6-8″ medium pink hibiscus flowers with a red eye summer through mid fall. Cut back to around 4″ tall in November. Prefers full sun and wet situations, but will tolerate normal gardens if not allowed to dry out. Easy to grow. Very showy in bloom. Deer resistant. USDA zones 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

REBLOOMING IRIS:

Aaron’s Dream – Tall Bearded

Large flowered clear powder blue iris to 30″ with deep lavender blue beards that is one of the prettiest rebloomers we have. Once established in your garden Aaron’s Dream can bloom anytime between April and late fall. US zones 5-10 in hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amber Amulet – Tall Bearded

Nicely contrasting highly ruffled white flowers with a medium orange edge on both standards and falls on 36″ stems both spring and fall. The color reminds us of a 50-50 bar if you remember what that is. New hybrid rebloomer filling a hard to get color choice for the garden. USDA zones 5-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn Rain – Tall Bearded

Stunning, deep purple and blue highly ruffled flowers with a blue beard are produced on 32-36″ stems both spring and fall. Probably the showiest of all the “blues” in the reblooming world. USDA zones 5-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Who – Tall Bearded

Opposites attract in this great new reblooming iris. Ruffled deep purple and orange falls with a bright orange beard topped with orange standards on 36″ stems both spring and fall. USDA zones 5-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presby’s Crown Jewel – Tall Bearded

What a show off! Whoever Presby was, this iris most certainly was their crown jewel. Bright violet edging on both the standards and over-sized falls makes this plicata something special-a real eye popper! The flowers are born on 36″ stems both in the spring and the fall. US Zone 5-10 in hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Return of Innocence – Tall Bearded

Perfectly formed white reblooming iris producing highly ruffled flowers with a white/yellow beard both spring and fall. USDA zones 5-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SALVIAS:

Salvia Black and Blue

Hands down, garden’s most handsome plant: tall, dark green stems; bright sage green leaves; abundant 1 1/2″ florets of the richest blue with truly black sepals just below the petals. Not only are they gorgeous, but they bloom relentlessly from late spring to early autumn. The tall, graceful plants, 4 ft. x 3 ft. work beautifully in large pots, but stunningly as borders or hedges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia Wendy’s Wish

Noted for its long blooming season and citrus scent, SalviaWendy’s Wish‘ (Sage) is a clump-forming perennial featuring showy spikes of large, loose clusters of magenta pink flowers, emerging from papery, dusty pink bracts. Zone 9-11.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia farinacea, Evolution

Evolution is the first Salvia farinacea with violet flower spikes. … Native to Texas, Salvia farinacea is heat and drought tolerant. Evolution is low maintenance. No deadheading is needed for all-season color.  Zone 7-12.  16 – 18 inches high.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia leucantha ‘Danielle’s Dream’

Compact and long blooming, this salvia is covered with soft pink flowers surrounded by velvety white bracts. Great for cut flowers.   Zone 8-11,   Full sun,  Average water, well drained soil.  Spread 3-4 ft height and width

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia macrophylla, Tingo Blue

Native to Tingo Peru, here is another unusual Sage that is not often seen, but oh so garden worthy! There are 2 forms to Salvia macrophylla and on offer here is the upright version growing tall and stately without the tendency to spread nor wander like the lower form. It is a very beautiful plant that blooms in an exquisite brilliant blue with extremely long protruding white stamens, wonderfully contrasted by lime green calyces. 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia microphylla, Hot Lips

Hot Lips Littleleaf Sage (Salvia microphyllaHot Lips‘) is a long-blooming Sage that blooms all summer with eye-catching red and white bicolor flowers. Zone 7-10 Full sun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia madrensis ‘Red Neck Girl’

Salvia madrensis ‘Red Neck Girl’ Sage, Forsythia Sage is a big robust perennial from the mountains of Mexico. It has large triangular leaves and late season terminal clusters of showy yellow flowers which give it it’s common name. This plant likes sun and good soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia x ‘Embers Wish’

Bright coral-colored, tubular blossoms contrast handsomely with the deep maroon stems, rusty rose calyxes and mid-green foliage of Ember’s Wish Sage  zone 9-11, Full sun to partial shade, Average water needs.

 

 

 

 

 

SUCCULENTS:

Ripple Jade Plant (Crassula Arborensces)

Compact, rounded heads atop sturdy branches give a bonsai type appeal to the ripple jade plant (Crassula arborescens ssp. undulatifolia). It can grow into a rounded shrub, with mature plants capable of reaching 3 to 4 feet (.91 to 1.2 m.) in height, according to ripple jade plant info. Bluish leaves are twisted and erect, sometimes with purple edging when this plant is growing in the right place. Growing ripple jade, also called curly jade, is a joy when it’s located in a happy spot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campfire (Crassula Campfire)

Crassula capitella ‘Campfire‘ is a branching, succulent plant with fleshy, propeller-like leaves that mature from light green to bright red. It grows prostrate, forming mats up to 6 inches (15 cm) tall and up to 3 feet (90 cm) wide. Clusters of white flowers rest on the leaves in the summer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shark’s Tooth (Crassula corynbalosa)

(Crassula corymbulosa): A stemmed succulent with tall stacks of narrow, pointed leaves that flush red when gently stressed by sun and drought. In the wild, it grows on dry, rocky slopes in Namibia and South Africa and blooms mid-summer to fall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grey Red (Echeveria)

Echeveria are some of the most colorful and spectacular succulent plants. They grow very large with thick succulent leaves in a rosette form. Echeveria succulent plants are originally from Mexico and Central America. Bell shaped flowers on long stems can be yellow, orange, red or pink. Some varieties are more tolerant of wet and cold than others. All echeveria can withstand fairly cold temperatures if the soil they are planted in is dry and there isn’t any water on the leaves. Frequent rain and cold on their leaves will cause rot and disease. As the plants grow, remove the dead leaves at the plant’s base. Echeveria can look amazing in containers, and mass plantings.   Not Cold Hardy.

 

 

 

 

 

Propellar Plant (Crassula Falcata)

Crassula Falcata, also known as Propeller Plant is an interesting succulent with blue-grey propeller-shaped leaves arranged in overlapping pattern. It is also called “Airplane Plant” because of its wing-like shape. In summer, it produces amazing dense clusters of scarlet red flowers that attract birds and bees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senecio Crassissimus

Senecio (Senecio crassissimus) (Humbert): A unique looking species from Madagascar that appears to have its leaves turned on their sides. The foliage is silvery-green, flat, and oval with a vibrant purple margin.  Fleshy blue-green leaves with purple margins are flat so they can change direction and never had a flat surface that faces the sun.  This serves them well in the sweltering heat of Madagascar where they are endemic..  These flat leaves almost resemble propellers on a prop plane.  It is not cold hardy so must be grown in a container and brought in for the winter.  Drought tolerant once established but it needs excellent drainage

 

 

 

 

ZINNIA:

Zinnia elegans ‘Macarenia’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zinnia elegans ‘Zinderella Peach’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zinnia ele. ‘Zinderella White’

Zinnia ele. Zinderella White Zinnia elegans Zinnia elegans. Zinderellas are a new form of “Scabiosa-flowered” Zinnias that will knock your socks off. Looking like a cross between an African Marigold and a double Coneflower, the 2″ wide flowers have a single base layer of petals topped with a dense dome of ruffles surrounding a dark eye.

Zinderella White yields masses of cream petals darkening to a pale golden eye. Height: 25″ to 30″.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER ASSORTED PERENNIALS:

 

Agapanthus ‘Streamline’

Agapanthus Streamline aka Lily-of-the-Nile. Grows in Sun to Part Sun. Flower Color is and blooms in . Hardiness zone 7a-10b. The medium blue flowers — with hints of lavender and a darker strip on the petals — are lovely in July and August on this dwarf evergreen perennial to only 16 tall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agastache Blue Fortune

The well-branched stems require no cutting back as the season progresses, and they are a great addition to bouquets. Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerant of some light shade. Good soil drainage is essential. Plants will perform poorly and may not survive winter in hard clay soils that retain moisture. Plants tolerate heat and some dry soils once established. Deadhead spent flowers to promote additional bloom. Agastache hybrids are typically winter hardy to at least USDA Zone 6. Where winter survival is a potential problem, plants should be sited in protected locations (e.g., southern exposures) with leaf and flower stems being left in place over winter for additional protection. Sandy/gravelly mulches will protect plants and help to avoid onset of rot. Hybrids grown from seed will usually not come true. Zone 5-10

 

 

Alocasia odora

Looking like a pint-sized elephant ear plant, exotic alocasia odora can be tucked into almost any sized landscape for an instant jungle accent.  If you love the look of elephant ears but don’t have the room, this plant is for you.  It only grows to 3 or 4 feet tall.  Alocasia is easy care in the right location. It takes sun or shade but seems to do best in part shade where it might get early morning or late day sun, mixed with dappled light through the afternoon.  These plants do spread but not in a way that will get out of hand. They look very beautiful when left to naturalize in a deep bed.  Alocasias are often referred to as elephant ears because many varieties look very similar.

 

 

 

 

Alstroemeria florist assorted colors: 

Florist type long stemmed Peruvian lily with coral and yellow flowers spring through fall on 30″ stems. Makes a great cut flower. Plant in medium to light shade. Give good drainage and average water. Feed with slow release all purpose fertilizer late winter and summer. Best to mulch in zone 7 with pine straw or comparable to over winter. USDA zone 7 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asarum Splendens

Asarum splendens is a vigorous and superbly easy-to-grow Chinese wild ginger that makes a great evergreen groundcover for the woodland garden. The large, dark green, deer-resistant leaves (evergreen to 10 degrees F) are heavily adorned with silvery mottling throughout.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bears Breech (Acanthus mollis)

Large deeply cut leafs from a basal clump grows to 3′ tall and around 5′ wide. Tall slender flower stalks rise to 4′ or more showing purple/white/green flowers in summer. Grows best in light shade. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant. Feed with all purpose fertilizer during growing season. Winter deciduous where hard freezes occur. USDA zone 7 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Bears Breech (Acanthus mollis latilatifolius)

Acanthus mollis ‘Latifolius’. Handsome and stately with dense clumps of deeply lobed leaves and stiff spikes densely packed with four rows of purple shrouded white flowers. This variant on Acanthus mollis is denser and squatter than the type. The leaves are broader in their lobes, making the lobes ovelap and creating very dense cover. Winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is easily grown in average, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Plants tolerate a wide range of soils except poorly-drained ones. Plants may not flower well in too much shade. Late spring frosts can impair or eliminate flowering for the year. Remove flowering stalks after blooming. This leaf is different that the acanthus mollis.

 

 

 

Bears Breech, White Water (Acanthus ‘White Water’)

Great new Bear’s Breech with lightly mottled white variegation and pure white flowers and white flower stalks rising above the foliage to 3′. This variety is more compact than standard Acanthus mollis. Grows well in light to medium shade. Deciduous in zones 7-8. USDA zone 7 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

Buddleia ‘Buzz Series’ Midnight

Compact habit (especially for butterfly bush) to around 4′ tall and a bit wider with highly showy honey scented 5″ flowers spikes in a wide array of colors spring through fall. Flowers are irresistible to butterflies and bees. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Easy to grow. Drought tolerant once established. Prune hard in late winter to promote better new growth. Can be pruned back hard in summer to get better second bloom cycle. USDA zones 5-10 in cold hardiness.   Midnight is a deep purple flower.

 

 

 

 

 

Candy Corn Plant (Cuphea micropetala):  2 gallon, $18

Winter deciduous perennial in zones 7-9, and evergreen in zone 10. This cuphea is a true perennial growing to 4′ tall and a bit wider each season producing 1″ orange flowers tipped yellow summer into fall. Irresistible to butterflies and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. Easy to grow. USDA zones 7b-10.

 

 

 

Catmint Walker’s Low  (Nepeta Walker’s Low)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese Foxglove (Rehmannia elata):  1 gallon, $12

Shade loving spreading perennial with large, 2″ violet-pink tubular flowers on multi branched slender stalks summer through fall. All parts toxic if eaten. Highly deer resistant. Plant in light to medium shade. Give good drainage and average water. Feed with all purpose fertilizer during growing season. Cut back to ground in winter. Easy to grow. USDA zone 5 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese Indigo (Indigofera incarnta):  2 gallon, $20

Commonly known as Chinese indigo, this deciduous shrub grows on streams and in woodlands in its native Japan and China and is suited to average well-drained neutral to slightly alkaline soil and medium moisture. It can be sun, heat and drought tolerant; but in a hot, humid atmosphere, it benefits from afternoon shade.  It can also suffer damage to the branch tips in a harsh winter.  As it flowers on new growth, it is best to prune to close to the ground or to live growth very early in the spring or even late winter.
This indigo is spreading at 3-4 feet wide and 1-2 1/2 feet tall.  It’s leaves are dark green of 8 inch pinnate leaflets and can be used for indigo dye.  The flowering time is concentrated June and July and may be extended to September in sporadic blooms.  The pea-shaped pink blooms are held in narrow racemes of 4-8 inches.

 

 

 

Cordyline Red Sister

Red Sister Cordyline known as Hawaiian Ti or Red Ti. You’ll find this tropical perennial shrub commonly used for ornamental purposes achieving a height of 6 – 10 feet. It is best known for its distinctive bronze-green and burgundy pink foliage Outdoors, ti plant (Cordyline fruticosa) makes a fantastic patio plant for dramatic container gardens where it pairs wonderfully with impatiens, sweet potato vine, browallia, and other favorites. In frost-free regions, it’s grown as a landscape shrub where ti plant adds color and drama to yards all year long. When growing ti plant outdoors, give it some shade from the hot afternoon sun. Keep the soil moist, but not wet for extended periods. As a landscape shrub outdoors, it’s hardy in Zones 10-11.

 

 

 

 

Cordyline terminalis “Miss Andrea”

Cordyline terminalis ‘Miss Andrea’ is a stunning variety with broad variegated grey, green, purple, and cream leaves. ‘Miss Andrea’ has a tight, compact habit.  Height 2-3 feet, average water, Full sun to part shade. Zone 9-11

 

 

 

 

 

Crinum x amabile Baby Burgundy

This small crinum likes to multiply! It will make a very decorative clump of purple/burgundy foliage. Bulbs are naturally small but most are already starting to offset . Moist soil  Sun or shade. Pink blossom.

 

 

 

 

Dianella LemonLime

These evergreen, clump-forming perennials are delightful plants for a shaded place in a warm-temperate garden. The striping on the strap-like leaves that shoot up from underground rhizomes ranges from lemon yellow to lime green alternating with dark green. Small, starry, purple-blue flower clusters appear in spring followed by glistening turquoise blue berries. Zone 8-11, Part sun, Regular Water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’

Eucomis comosa ‘Sparkling Burgundy‘ The flowers form on 20- to 30-inch stalks bearing bottle-brush-like wands of tight, smokey pink florets, which are crowned by tufts of purple bracts. As the common name implies, these unusual and magnificent inflorescences are reminiscent of pineapples.lowers appear in summer and are arranged in a spike, topped by a “head” of green leaflike bracts.

 

 

 

 

 

Eucomis Tuglea Gem

Eucomis ‘Tugela Gem’ is a hybrid from New Zealand pineapple lily breeder, Eddie Welsh. Eucomis ‘Tugela Gem’ forms a rosette of rippled-edged, fleshy, green leaves, topped in July (NC) with 28″ tall spikes, composed of lovely rosy pink flowers. After the flowers age, the developing seed pods turn a striking dark purple…quite unusual and very attractive. Zones: 6b to 9b

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farfugium japonicum ‘Giganteum’

Evergreen (Deciduous in zone 7) flowering perennial with giant, glossy leaves and bright yellow flowers on 32″ stems late summer through fall. Flowers can be enjoyed or pruned out to encourage foliage. Plant in shade to light shade with good drainage, organic matter, and ample consistent moisture. Highly sought after. USDA zone 7 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

Farfugium japonicum ‘Shishi Botan’

Highly ruffled/crinkled leaves to 12″ on a very compact unusual looking plant that resemble curly parsley. The ruffles seem to have ruffles. New variety. Has the typical yellow asters on long, loose spikes to 2′ in the fall. Plant in medium shade. Give good drainage and average but consistent water. Deer resistant. USDA zone 7b-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Hosta Guacomole

An aptly named rich green, large-leaved variety with chartreuse centers (the color of freshly sliced avocado) edged with a wide, dark green margin. The large, fragrant white flowers of ‘Guacamole’ add spice late in the season. Expect a plant with big impact. We like it combined with blue-leaved Hostas or native Ferns.  Zone 3-9 , part sun to shade, blooms July- August.

 

 

 

 

 

Hummingbird Bush (Dicliptera suberecta)

Evergreen perennial (deciduous in zones 7-8) with soft, fuzzy, gray foliage that forms a thick clump to 18″ tall and 3′ wide in time with medium orange tubular flowers formed on long slender spikes late spring through fall. Can bloom right up to the first killing freeze. Attractive to hummingbirds. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. USDA zones 7-11. Native to Uruguay. Rare.

 

 

 

 

 

Lavandula x ‘Phenomenal’

New hybrid English type lavender with highly fragrant gray foliage on a densely growing clump. Slender purple flowers on 36″ stalks appear in summer and continue until fall. Used for sachets, perfumes, and all things lavender. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant. USDA zones 6-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Leucanthemum ‘Becky’:  

Beautiful single white large flowering shasta daisy to 36″ tall. Makes a great cut flower. Good fall rebloom. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Feed with all purpose fertilizer in early spring and again in mid-summer. Cut back after spring bloom is finished to promote better fall bloom. USDA zone 5 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Phlox subulata ‘Purple Beauty’

Low spreading ground cover to 6″ tall producing a mass display of intense purple blooms that entirely cover the plant in early spring. One of the first perennials to truly show off after the winter rest. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. USDA zones 3-8 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Phlox subulata ‘White Delight’

Low spreading ground cover to 6″ tall producing a mass display of clear white blooms that entirely cover the plant in early spring. One of the first perennials to truly show off after the winter rest. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. USDA zones 3-8 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink Milkweed (Aslecpias incarnata)

Rose Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) is a showy pink blooming Asclepias species that is a food plant for Monarch butterfly caterpillars and a nectar source for adult butterflies. Also called Swamp Milkweed, this milkweed actually grows well in both moderately moist and wet soils.

Zones 3-9.   Blooms early to late summer.

 

 

Silky Gold Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)

Unusual clusters of pure golden-yellow blooms, 3″ flowers attract butterflies all summer until frost. Plants thrive in hot weather. It is the host plant for Monarch and Queen butterfly caterpillars. A South American native, Silky Gold Milkweed grows 30″-36″ high and produces clusters of bright yellow flowers.

This plant is highly utilized by Monarch butterflies for egg-laying and used as a nectar source by many other butterfly species. Plant in full sun and treat as an annual. Save the seeds and start them yourself next year (this milkweed is easy to grow from seed). Shipped as rooted cuttings. Milkweed wilts in high heat above 95. These cuttings are about 3-5 inchs tall and will take up to two-three months to be full grown for Monarchs to feed on.  Zone 9-11.

 

 

 

Stokesia laevis ‘Colorwheel’

Evergreen flowering perennial with 3″ showy multi-colored daisy-like flowers on 18″ stems summer through fall. Flowers open white, age lavender, then dark purple. Makes a great cut flower. Plant in full to partial sun with good drainage and average water. Prefers acidic soil. Do not add lime. Native to the Southern Eastern US coastal plain. Easy to grow. USDA zone 5-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Stokesia Mary Gregory

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun. Tolerates filtered sunlight, but prefers full sun. Prefers moist, sandy soils, but has surprisingly good drought and heat tolerance. Wet soil in winter is the main cause of death for this plant. A well-drained soil is essential. These plants appreciate winter mulch in the northern parts of their growing range (USDA Zone 5). Deadhead individual spent flowers and remove spent flowering stems to encourage additional bloom. Plants can be cut back to basal foliage after bloom.  Zone 5-9

 

 

 

Stokesia laevis “Peachie’s Pick”

Evergreen perennial native to the coastal Carolinas with strappy, leathery green leaves in low clumps followed by a profusion of bright, showy lavender blue asters to 3″ across in late spring on 30″ stems. This form has fuller stems and wider flower petals than most. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Drought tolerant once established. Easy to grow. USDA zones 6-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Tricolor Ginger Stromanthe

The tricolor ginger produces reddish-pink flowers in the spring. The plant grows in clumps that reach 2 to 3 feet high and 1 to 2 feet wide. The leaves on this member of the prayer plant (maranta) family move with the sun so the tips can capture sunlight while the flat part of the leaf stays shielded. Many garden centers market ‘Triostar’ as a houseplant, though it can work in perennial beds in the warmer regions of the state. In North Florida, it can be grown outdoors as an annual.

If you plan to grow ‘Triostar’ outdoors, be sure to pick a shady location. Too much sun will cause the leaves to sunburn, resulting in unsightly brown splotches.  Indoors or out, the key is to give ‘Triostar’ the high humidity it craves. If you’re keeping the plant indoors, try misting it or keeping it in a humid location like a bathroom. Be sure to water regularly, though try to allow the soil to dry out between waterings.

When mature, ‘Triostar’ can reach two to three feet tall and one to two feet wide

 

 

 

Yarrow, Paprika (Achillea mil. ‘Paprika’)

Vigorous low spreading/clumping perennial with beautiful displays of bright red flowers with flat tops spring through fall. Flower spikes reach to around 18″ tall. Can be used as a cut flower and in dried arrangements. Plant in full sun. Easy to grow. USDA zone 3 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

Yarrow, Violet  (Achillea mil. ‘Violet’)

Vigorous low spreading/clumping perennial with beautiful displays of bright violet flowers with flat tops spring through fall. Stems reach to around 18″ tall. Can be used as a cut flower and in dried arrangements. Plant in full sun. Easy to grow. USDA zone 3 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

 

Yarrow, White (Achillea mil. ‘White’)

Vigorous low spreading/clumping perennial with beautiful displays of clear white flowers with flat tops spring through fall. Stems reach to around 18″ tall. Can be used as a cut flower and in dried arrangements. Plant in full sun. Easy to grow. USDA zone 3 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

 

VINES:

Passiflora edulis Maypop

Maypop is undoubtedly the showiest of the native Passiflora species. It is an evergreen, flowering vine that climbs by tendrils. Its height and spread varies depending on the structure it climbs on. The flower is a spectacular pink and purple and generally reaches a width of 3 to 5 inches. Each unique flower lasts about one day, appearing in the summer and early fall. The flowers fill the plant, making maypop a fine flowering plant for most of Florida. The leaves have three lobes and smooth margins. Ovoid, green fruits are abundantly produced and can be found on the vine along with the flowers. Fruits are light weight and the flesh is spongy and white. They are attractive and edible (but not very tasty) and attain a diameter of 2 ½ to 3 inches. Can be invasive.   Zone 7-11. Great pollenator.

 

 

Passiflora Incense Purple

Grow in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of drought. Winter hardy to around zero degrees Fahrenheit, Incense is a bit slower growing and less aggressive than some types with very pretty deep violet blue flowers. It adapts well to being grown indoors, although may sometimes need supplemental lighting. Incense is similar in color and growth habit to Inspiration, but is more cold tolerant, but less forgiving of heat and high humidity.

Zone 6-9,  Light shade

 

 

 

 

ANNUALS/CALADIUM:

Caladium, Buck/Red/Green Edge

Buck is a red Fancy Leaf caladium variety. These shade to partial sun loving caladium bulbs or tubers are great for adding easy color to your late spring and summer plantings. Buck is very similar to John Peed. It is an old, very hearty caladium variety that is considered medium to short in height (1-1.5 ft). Buck caladium bulbs are tropical foliage plants that are easy to grow in landscaping, pots and planters. Buck caladiums have medium sized leaves with dark red centers, dark red veins and a wide fern green margin. Caladium bulbs originated in the Amazon Basin, which is why they require and thrive in the warm summer day and night temperatures.

 

 

Caladium, White/Green Edge

White, green veins and border.

Grown specifically for their ornamental foliage, caladiums offer spectacular color through the summer. With its color, it can enhance almost any shady area, from patios and decks to shaded corners of the garden. Plant them in shady window boxes where sun-loving annuals won’t grow. Ideal for conservatory or warm porch during winter.

 

 

 

 

 

Caladium Flordia Moonlight

A luminious, almost entirely white leaf makes this caladium variety a total standout! Simply glowing in shady areas, Florida Moonlight is an excellent choice for container planting.

Caladium can be grown in any region as an indoor plant, but take care to only start outdoors once nighttime temperatures are high 60’s and above.

 

 

 

 

Caladium Miss Muffet

Sun tolerant, Caladium ‘Miss Muffet‘ (Angel Wings) is a tuberous perennial with lush, heart-shaped, chartreuse leaves adorned with dark pink freckles. The equally dark pink veins may bleed into the lime green background, adding further color contrast

 

 

 

 

 

EDIBLES

 

Vaccinium Blueberry ‘Springhigh’

Super early southern highbush blueberry that can be larger than the diameter of a quarter! Extremely self fruitful and low chill, the bush eventually reaches around 5-6′ tall and wide. Especially hybridized for Southern gardens. 200 hours chill requirement. USDA zones 8-10 in cold hardiness.

While this bush is self-pollinating, blueberries produce more prolifically when planted with a companion plant.  For best results, we recommend purchasing one of each type of blueberry or pairing with another southern highbush variety already in your garden.

 

 

 

Vaccinium Blueberry ‘Biloxi’

Super flavorful southern highbush blueberry that only has a chill requirement of 100 hours! Mostly evergreen, the bush eventually reaches around 5-6′ tall and wide. Especially hybridized for Southern gardens. USDA zones 8-10 in cold hardiness. Released and developed by Florida State University.

While this bush is self-pollinating, blueberries produce more prolifically when planted with a companion plant.  For best results, we recommend purchasing one of each type of blueberry or pairing with another southern highbush variety already in your garden.

 

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Vaccinium x ‘Sunshine Blue’

Self fertile Southern Highbush low chill (150 hours) blueberry growing to around 4′ tall and wide over time. Heavy production of very flavorful medium blue berries ranges from June through September! Even though it does not need a pollinator, the crop is heavier and the berries larger where other varieties are present. Great in the ground or in containers. “Sunshine Blue” is mostly evergreen where winters are mild. Plant in full sun to partial sun. Give good drainage and average water. Do not dry out during fruiting season. Plant using peat moss or other acidic planting medium when setting out into the garden. Fall color turns a brilliant red and orange in zones 5-8. USDA zones 5-10 in cold hardiness.

 

 

Ficus carica ‘Kadota’

Deciduous fruiting fig tree producing a copious amount of 1″ yellow figs with amber flesh July through late September. The flavor of the fruit is honey sweet and juicy. Kadota fig is probably the sweetest fig available in the industry today. Where it doesn’t freeze hard, prune the tree every year to around 4-5′ tall so that at picking time you can actually reach the fruit by hand. Otherwise, you may end up with a 20′ fig tree that only produces food for the local wildlife. Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Do not let dry out when the fruit is ripening. USDA zones 7-9 in cold hardiness.

 

 

 

Ficus carica ‘Violet de Bordeaux’

Deciduous fruiting fig tree producing a copious amount of 1″ purple figs with violet flesh July through late September. The flavor of the fruit is sweet and juicy. ‘Violet de Bordeaux’ is an old world variety cultivated since the 17th century. It is reported to be more cold hardy than most varieties. In addition, Violet de Bordeaux is the most compact fig we grow, only reaching a mature height of around 5′ tall! Plant in full sun. Give good drainage and average water. Do not let dry out when the fruit is ripening. USDA zones 6-9 in cold hardiness.